9th Graders Final Exam Prep / 11th Graders and College Recommendations

This is a two part post, but it’s going to be short. The first part is about final exams for freshman, and how to help them. The second part is about teaching students how to properly approach teachers for college recommendations.

First Final Exams in High School

I’m teaching freshpeople (9th graders) for the first time. And I’ve come to learn how important structure is for them. I’ve realized how useful it is to make topic lists for them (next year, I’m going to ween them off of them and show them how to create their own!). I’ve learned how important it is to be explicit with them about everything. And I’ve learned that many don’t quite know how to study.

In exactly a month, my kids are going to have their geometry final. So I whipped up a guide to explain how they might go about facing this daunting task. It’s not perfect. I hate the fact that it is so long and text heavy. But I want to get it out to my kids soon — so editing will have to wait for next year.

The truth is I don’t know if any of them are going to use it. But I’m going to at least provide them with some ideas — and maybe one or two things will resonate with them. Here it is below (and in .docx form). If you have any additional advice you give to your young ones that would go well in this, please throw them in the comments. Although I might not be able to add them for my kids this year, I can revise it for next year.

11th Graders Asking for College Recommendations

I am teaching a lot of juniors this year, which means I will be asked to write a lot of college recommendations. I never learned how to formally ask for a recommendation until I was in college — but when I was taught by a professor (who was helping guide me in the grad school application process) it was enlightening. I crafted a cover letter, got my best work together, and set up a time to meet with my professors who I was asking for aletting of recommendation from. At that meeting, I outlined why their classes were important to me, what I took away from them, and things I was proud of — and why I would really appreciate if they would be willing to take the time to do this huge thing for me. In other words, I was “pitching” this. It was thought-out, respectful, and professional.

When I first started teaching, kids would ask me for recommendations as a “by the way” in the hallway, or in a short one line email. I don’t allow for that anymore. I make sure they sit down with me and we talk through it. I ask them to fill out an extensive set of questions which often helps me frame the kids in my recommendation (if I don’t yet have a framing device in mind), and lets me learn about kids in a different way.

This year I sent an email out to my juniors, being as explicit as possible. It isn’t to make their lives harder. It is to teach them skills that are usually never explicitly taught. And all of this helps me craft a better recommendation.

Hi all,

I know it’s about the time that y’all are going to be thinking about soliciting college recommendations. If you are thinking of asking me to craft one, you should read this email. If you are certain you are not, you don’t need to read past this!

I know early in the third quarter I talked briefly about this in class, but I figured you should have it in writing too. First off, you should talk with your college counselor before approaching teachers about recommendations. They will be able to help you figure out if you’re asking the right people, who can write about the right qualities, for the colleges you are considering.

If you are going to approach me about being a recommender, there are some things you need to know. I am not a teacher who is grade-focused. I’m a teacher who values reflection, growth, hard-work, and demonstrated passion. If you’re a student who struggled but has shown a transformation in how you see and appreciate mathematics, or in your approach to effectively learning mathematics, or in how you communicate mathematics, or in your ability to work effectively and kindly in a group, or something else—all that is important to me. On the other hand, if you have done well on assessments, that is all well-and-good… but it is important that you are more than that… it is important to me that you have shown a passion to go above and beyond (inside and outside of the classroom and curriculum), or an enthusiasm for the material, or a willingness/eagerness to help others. In other words, it is important that you have thought about yourself, and can talk to me about how you are more than just grades.

That all being said, just a few reminders of what I said in class about recommendations:

· I do not write recommendations in the fall, so if you’re going to ask for one, you must ask me this year. Fall is a very busy time and is too far away; I like to have students fresh in my mind when I write. You also cannot approach me after our last day of classes (May 22).
· I never learned how to properly ask for recommendations until I was in college. So I want to help you learn that skill. (I’ve had to ask for recommendations in high school, college, grad school, and as a teacher.) If you’re going to ask me, send me an email to set up a meeting to talk formally about it. You need to plan this meeting, because you’re going to be in charge of leading it. Think about what you’re going to ask and how you’re going to pitch it.
· I said in class that you should start keeping a list in the back of your notebook of specific moments that you’re particularly proud of (large and small!), and things that you’ve done that might set you apart or make you unique or interesting! You should be sure to bring that to our meeting. If you have specific things you’ve done throughout the year that you are proud of (large or small!), you should bring those too.

As you might suspect, I write recommendations with great integrity—meaning I am honest and specific in what I write.

In the past I’ve been asked for a lot of recommendations from juniors. This year I may have to put a cap on how many I’m writing for, unfortunately, as each recommendation takes a number of hours from start to finish. After we meet, if I agree to write for you, you will be asked to fill out an extensive reflective questionnaire. I recognize that I ask a lot of students who request a recommendation, but I also know how important these recommendations are – and to do justice in the recommendation, these are important to me.

Always,
Mr. Shah

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3 comments

  1. I am teaching 9th graders next year! Alg1 and Geometry. I start thinking about my lessons now, and the final, and the big ideas I want them to know are integral to how I present and scaffold. Your comments are strong reminders to me about how they learn (it’s been YEARS since I’ve had 9th graders!) Thank you. I will look forward to some feedback (hopefully) of how your crew responded to the study guide!

  2. Thanks for sharing this, Sam! I, too, teach freshpeople, and one of my goals for next year is to build in little chunks of “this is how you study for math” throughout the year. Hopefully, by the end they’ll have quite the toolbox for ideas on how to actually study… Anyway, your thoughts in this document are helpful in thinking about that process! So far, for studying methods, I’ve thought of: highlighting or rewriting/reorganizing notes, making notecards, resolving practice problems, making some type of concept map (answering, how are these things related?), and making up new practice problems. The last one is pretty meta, but what would a world be like if a majority of students could make up their own problems? Anyway, thanks again for posting!

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