Uncategorized

Ally Week

I was getting the math space ready with some climate change infographics when a health teacher walked by and mentioned that the following week (now this week) is Ally Week. I wasn’t aware. So thanks to twitter (@benjamindickman and @annie_p and @LauraVHawkins) I put up some information on some gay and trans mathematicians in the math space.

But I also had my classes engage in such a simple way. I just added this to their nightly work:

image

Those links, so you can click on them, are:

a) https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/roots-of-unity/q-a-with-autumn-kent/

and

b) https://anthonybonato.com/2017/06/19/on-being-a-gay-mathematician/

The way I facilitated this in my classes was very similar, and really informal. In one, I had people “popcorn” their thoughts about the article they read, share something that struck them, ask questions they had, make note of something they never considered until reading the article. In another, I had groups talk about what they read, and then we talked as a whole class, people sharing out what their groups said. (I think if I did this in the future, I might have everyone pull up the article on their laptops so they could refer to them for quotations, or to de-stress kids who don’t want to mischaracterize something they read.) I did almost no talking. I just kept silent, and let kids share in the whole class. Pro tip: sometimes I find it’s effective to a little silence go for 20 or 30 seconds, and then someone else will say something. And if I think things are coming to an end with a tremendous silence, I say “okay, we have time for one more thing.”

Then after they shared, I brought us together as a class. To talk a bit about allyship specifically, I read this paragraph from Anthony Bonato’s piece on being a gay mathematician aloud (this was something most students mentioned when talking about the pieces… it stood out to them):

I didn’t experience explicit discrimination until I was working on my doctorate. One of the professors in my Department told me to be careful about being open about my sexuality, as it would make professors and students uncomfortable.  He thought he was doing me a favor, I think. I nodded politely and buried the incident away in my memory. Being gay often involves so many of these small defeats, these small let downs, that it becomes part of our everyday experience.

In two classes, I asked students “If you wanted to be a strong ally and they were in the professor’s shoes, what are actions you could take to support Anthony?”

In one class, we talked more about Autumn Kent (who is a mathematician who is trans). And I asked where in the piece she mentions how to be an ally, and we reviewed that together

Sometimes we need a shoulder, or an ear. Or just some normalcy.

The thing I think most people don’t see is the constant underlying dread, anxiety, stress, and anguish that a lot of us are carrying around. A lot of the time I am walking to and from my daily tasks, my inner voice hoarse from screaming. After the election I would be out and hear people making small talk about the sunshine and I’d want to tear out my hair. When I am doing bureaucratic tasks at work, I am carrying all of my anguish. When I am teaching and getting a laugh from my class I am carrying my anguish. When I am writing that email. When I am in the elevator or at the water fountain. When you ask how it’s going I am frozen. I am saturated with grief.

Listen to us.

In all my classes, I had to come out during this discussion. And I did it by explaining why I had them do this assignment… I talked about when I was in high school, there weren’t really any out kids, and definitely no out teachers (that I knew about), and no real representation of the queer community. And how I’m so happy times have changed, and hearing stories is such a big part of that. And so I wanted to share these stories, to show that being a mathematician does have something to do with sexuality and gender identity… because being a mathematician means being in a community with other people.  I ended by sharing the quotation that stuck out the most to me, because I felt it a lot in my first years of teaching. It was from Anthony Bonato’s piece:

We edit ourselves by asking internally a series of questions.  While lecturing does the audience think less of me if they know I am gay? When colleagues talk about their family over dinner is it OK for me to join in and talk about [my] husband too? Am I acting too queer in front of my students?

And I mentioned that lots of people in all sorts of marginalized communities do this kind of editing, because they don’t know what’s in the hearts and minds of people who are around them. Which is why being an ally can be so important — to show what’s in your heart and mind.

I remember when I first started teaching, saying I was gay was something I thought I didn’t need to do to students or other faculty members. I’m a math teacher. I was still getting my bearing and earning my stripes. Would it come in the way of me getting my stripes? Would students use it against me? Why would it ever matter in our math class? But I know it does matter. Because when I was younger, there was no one. No representation. It’s not that I didn’t think I could be a mathematician. It was worse. I thought that I was alone in the world, and I was wrong in the world. And so in this activity, it would have been disingenuous to not come out, if only to honor the transformation I’ve gone through from my youth to today.

Regardless, if you are a math teacher and are wondering if there is a way to push the needle forward in your classroom on LGBTQ+ issues, maybe try something simple like this. You don’t have to be queer or trans, it only takes 10 or 15 minutes of class time, and it sends a signal out there that you are an ally and care. About these stories, and implicitly to your students, about your students’ stories.

Update: It’s Friday evening now. It has been an impossibly long week, with late nights. And parent night on Thursday night keeping me at school until 9pm. I’ve been exhausted. But I want to archive one more moment from Friday.

It was after a lunch meeting. Our school has something called “CCEs” (continuing the conversation events) where student leaders lead discussions on important topics. Today’s CCE was around Ally Week and pronouns. I go to the room. It’s a large classroom for our school, but designed for maybe 20 students. By the time everyone got there, I’d estimate there were over 60 students/faculty in attendance. We watched two videos and then have an interesting discussion. I don’t want to share what was said, since confidentiality was one of our norms. I do want to share what happened to me. I was in the room, and I was overwhelmed by the attendance and the seriousness by which everyone was taking things. And while watching the videos about trans vocabulary and getting everyone on the same page, the video had a section on transitioning. And for some reason, with that word, I was flooded with emotion. My eyes were literally tearing, and I had to keep wiping them for the remaining 20 minutes. I was afraid if I spoke aloud to share my thoughts, I would start speaking and my voice would start warbling and then descend into sobs. So I didn’t speak. I don’t know what evoked this big emotion. In my mind were the multiple memoir books I’ve read about trans women. In my mind was the TV show Pose and documentary Paris is Burning. In my mind I was surrounded by kids who cared, and maybe a kid or two who identified or were in the process of identifying as trans. In my mind was all the hardships trans people face that we couldn’t even start to understand. In my mind was the many murders of trans people. In my mind was simultaneously hope and despair. And so I kept looking up at the ceiling, and wiping my eyes, hoping no one would see me. Because we were watching videos and everyone was sharing super interesting things.

I was happy when it was over and I could go wipe my eyes properly in the math office. I tissued my eyes dry, no one was around. Then a colleague/friend walked in and we started speaking about the CCE, and just a few words out of my mouth and what I feared would happen in the CCE happened. My voice warbled and the tears just started flowing. I don’t know why. I was exhausted. I was emotional. I couldn’t speak. I tried to explain in the 30 seconds we had, then I wiped my tears away, stuffed a few extra tissues into my pocket, and went to teach my 90 minute class. I walked into the door, took a few breaths, and said “Happy Friday Everyone,” before getting us started on combinatorics.

What I Owe My Students

This year, in my Algebra II classes, I used a chunk of classtime to set some norms and to get some vulnerability together. I honestly felt like it brought us closer together, and I’m so grateful I did it. I hope to write a longer post about that soon, but I wanted to share the very last part of what I did.

I asked my students for three things of what I owed to them. I loved what they came up with. These kids are already so awesome. And these are all things I know I can work hard on giving them.

pic1.png

pic2.png

I see a lot of commonalities in what they wrote.

Understanding that math doesn’t always come easily to my students. Patience and kindness. Making mistakes and being lost and confused something that is okay and not something to be shamed. Recognizing that math is just one part of students lives. Promising to help students. Clarity. Fairness. Engagement. Encouragement.

I am getting these made into posters which I am going to hang up in the back of my classroom, where I can see them each day… reminders of what my responsibilities are, and seeing where I might be falling short.

Our new “Math Space”

‘For the last year or two, I’ve seen so many people tweet about they have tables in their math classrooms where they put math or math-adjacent things for kids to fiddle around with before/after school or during their free time. Here is a recent tweet thread:

So of course, color me insanely jealous. (I think I first heard of this idea from Sara Van Der Werf on this blogpost.) The thing is… I really want kids to see math as something that exists outside of the math classroom. And anytime I see an opportunity to do that, I go for it. So things like math club and math team, yes, I’ve led those in the past. Independent studies/work with kids, yes. But I like the idea of opening up the umbrella of what counts as math. So a few years ago I helped organize a math-art gallery (with real mathematical artists!) at my school — with an exhibition called Technically BeautifulOr organizing math-related book clubs with kids (from Flatland, to Hidden Figures, to How Not To Be Wrong, to whatever.) Or assigning my “explore math” project to some of my classes.

The appeal of the math play space was so strong that last year I decided I would make one for this year. The tricky part is that in my school, we don’t have our own classrooms. Last year, I taught in four different classrooms. But luckily outside of the math office, we used to have a long bench where only a few kids sat on when waiting for class or a meeting. So my plan: remove the bench and make a math play table/space right there.

My colleague and friend Danielle was interested in the idea, so we basically just did it. We asked maintenance to remove the bench. We set up three card tables. And we had the space ready for the first day of school. Ready to see what it looks like?!?

aaa1.png

I’ll go through what exists in our space now.

When discussing the space, we agreed that it had to look cozy and inviting. So with our limited artistic skills, we put together this beautiful sign. We tried hard to come up with a better name, but we kept on converging on this simple one… so we went with it. We literally crumpled paper of different colors and tacked them up to write the word space. I’m actually in love with the way it looks. It was what we had around, and we got creative!

aaa2.png

Now on the left side we have this:

aaa3.png

This little cart was being thrown away by a third grade teacher, so we stole it! We put showerboard on it so it can act as a whiteboard, and if you look closely, we have some whiteboard markers below for students to us. On the board itself is a number game lifted totally wholesale from David Butler (his post about it is here). The idea is that with four small numbers (e.g. 1, 10, 10, 7) and two large numbers (e.g. 60, 120), students should attempt to make the target number 121.

After showing this to one of my precalculus classes, a student was obsessed with trying to get the target number using all six numbers, and came up quickly with a way to do it. He was super proud, and rightfully so!

Next we have two card tables covered with some fun cloth I found at home.

aaa4.png

These are books that I brought in for kids to thumb through (though they just have to ask and they can take it home to read!). I have a zillion books that could go here… My criteria was nothing that could turn off a student easily. So a book of math poems, a childrens book about Sophie Germain, a math book based in funny comic strips, women in mathematics book, and a couple “math novels.” I even had a math department colleague/friend write a “recommendation note” that we stuck in The Housekeeper and the Professor, like this was a book store! (I asked our school librarians if they had the little book stands, and they were happy to give me some!)

aaa8.png

Ikea had some $1 picture frames, so we used them to post some puzzles and jokes!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We also put out some puzzles from Play With Your Math which we thought had a low barrier of entry but that kids might enjoy!

We also have a little estimation station (currently of jars with rice in them):

aaa12.png

And of course we saw that Sarah Carter had provided us with a lot of math jokes that we could steal and use in our math space… So we have that up also! Because how could we not?!?!

Lastly, we have a “tinker table” where we have some tiling turtles, other tiles, and a weird set of puzzle pieces which need to get put back into a square shape.

aaa16.png

And that… is about it!

At the start of putting things together, we realized we needed a bit of a formal vision for us to stick to… so we drafted this super quickly, but it was something we both felt was approximately right:

Vision: To create an unstructured public space where kids can relax and fiddle/tinker around with fun math things that might not be related to things in the formal curriculum. The hope is that this allows for the experiencing of math as something casual and playful. We want this space to encourage students to want to talk mathematically with each other.

Through this space, which will be curated and changed periodically, we want to widen the umbrella of what gets counted as “math” and “doing math,” and who gets to be counted as a mathematician. 

We encouraged teachers at the start of the year to share information about the math space with their classes, even writing them a blurb they could read in their classroom but also encouraging them to leave their class five minutes early to bring kids over to just look around. What we wanted teachers to emphasize? “Most importantly, we don’t want you to be scared to sit down there. We spent time making this space for you. We want to say that again — this space is for you! Pick up books and see what they’re about. Make designs with the tiles. Flip the joke page over to see what the groan-worthy punchline is. Try the number game puzzle out, or pick up the paper folding puzzle that we have there for you. Make an estimate for the estimation challenge. We want you to feel comfortable here — not treat it like a museum.”

Lastly, you might have noticed that in the vision we mentioned that the math space is designed to changed periodically. That’s the goal. Of course the jokes will change each week as will the numbers for the number challenge. But everything else — books, estimation, picture frames, tiles — will be swapped out. We have a giant list we’ve brainstormed of things that we could put in this space, and we’ll make decisions as we see if and how kids are using it. Some ideas include:

  • Instructions for the game of SET, and space for kids to play the game!
  • Wooden “put these together to form this neat shape” puzzles
  • Legos
  • A variety of math poems that students can take and put in their pockets during Poetry Week at our school
  • A spirograph or two
  • Math and Climate Change coloring books with lots of colored pencils (where we hang up the pages on the bulletin board after things get filled in)
  • Towers of Hannoi
  • Origami paper and instructions
  • 3D printed mathematical objects, including cool math based optical illusions (like these!)
  • A museum of WEB Du Bois stunning and eye-opening infographics involving race in America
  • Geoboards
  • Information on women mathematicians and mathematicians of color and mathematicians that are LGBTQ+ and…
  • Fun little math problems (the size of a business card) that kids can pick up and bring with them

I actually have so many more ideas on my list, but it’s all written so informally no one would ever fully make sense of things. But these are just some. But if you have ANY other ideas that you think would make sense here, I’d love to get a nice long public list for math play spaces — so throw any ideas down in the comments.

With that, I’m out!

 

 

 

The Finals for the Big Internet Math Off 2019

This summer, I’ve been “competing” in the Big Internet Math Off 2019. It’s a competition where 16 math-y people share their favorite or interesting bits of mathematics, and each day people vote. Believe it or not, I made it to the final two competitors — and today is THE FINALS.

If you’d like to read my post and my competitor’s post and vote, I’d appreciate it:

The Big Internet Math-Off: The final – Sameer Shah vs Sophie Carr

It will only take a short time (no need to login or anything to vote, the only time it will really take is the reading).

My mathematical tidbit today attempts to have you look at these two squares, a 17×17 colorful square and a 127×127 greyscale square.

squares.pngBoth are… slightly uninteresting.

My goal, through the post, is to show you that both of these squares are insanely interesting. I call them the most beautiful 17×17 and 127×127 squares ever. And my conclusion: once you learn about the mathematics embedded in these squares, you’ll never look at them the same way again. You can’t.

It’s like having a huge a-ha moment when learning something. It completely transforms the way you look at something, so you can’t see it in its original form again.

I hope you enjoy!

If you want to see my five entries into the Big Internet Math Off 2019:

Entry 1: a counfounding conundrum: https://aperiodical.com/2019/07/the-big-internet-math-off-2019-group-2-jorge-nuno-silva-vs-sameer-shah/

Entry 2: a card trick: https://aperiodical.com/2019/07/the-big-internet-math-off-2019-group-2-vincent-pantaloni-vs-sameer-shah/

Entry 3: a magical property of circles: https://aperiodical.com/2019/07/the-big-internet-math-off-2019-group-1-marianne-and-rachel-vs-sameer-shah/

Entry 4: an unexpected break in a mathematical pattern: https://aperiodical.com/2019/07/the-big-internet-math-off-2019-semi-final-1-lucy-rycroft-smith-vs-sameer-shah/

Entry 5 (the one outlined in this post): two beautiful squares: https://aperiodical.com/2019/07/the-big-internet-math-off-the-final-sameer-shah-vs-sophie-carr/

A Much Belated Overview of My Advanced Geometry Curriculum

I recently got an email from someone who saw some of my many posts on geometry (you can see all my posts about geometry by clicking here). I realized I never shared them formally and everything is a bit scattered. So I’m going to try to include a few resources here. But the real joy is in all the blogposts, honestly.

I taught Advanced Geometry at my school for two years (2014-2016), and I wrote the curriculum with a good friend and dear colleague. We both hadn’t taught geometry before and decided we’d do a super deep dive and come up with a sequencing that made sense to us, and that prioritized conjecturing and noticing. In fact, we were so excited by this process that we shared our thinking both about how we built up the curriculum but also how we collaborated at a conference. Below are our slides, but you can also click here and go to the slideshow and read some of our presenter notes for each slide for more detail.

We were super intentional about everything. We carefully thought through how we wanted to motivate everything, and we didn’t want to give anything away throughout the course. In other words, we wanted kids to do all the heavy lifting and to be the mathematicians that we knew they could be.

Below is a word document with all our skills/topics (you can download the .docx file here: All Topic Lists Combined). The order might seem a little strange (we end, for example, the year with triangle congruence), but it worked for us! Everything was done on purpose (in this case, congruence is just a special case of similarity… so that came beforehand, along with trig which is all about exploiting similarity!). We eschewed two-column proofs for different forms (paragraph proofs, flowchart proofs, and anything else that showed logical reasoning).

Oh wait! For some reason our work on Area and Volume didn’t have a topic list. And I just looked and my core packet for Area and Volume derivations (where kids just figure things out on their own) has handdrawn images in it, but I didn’t scan a PDF of those. Well, at some point in the future if I remember, I’ll try to write a post to share that. (We did it after kids learned trigonometry, so they had a lot of flexibility. For example, I think kids came up with like 6 different methods to find the area of a trapezoid when they were asked to create a formula and justify it!)

I hope this is helpful for anyone trying to think through geometry. As I said before, the best thing might be to just read the blogposts, but this is a bit of an overview.

“How I Have Changed the Way I Have Thought about Myself and the World”

In the past few years, my school started a “senior speech” program. Five seniors get up and talk to all students and faculty in grades 9-12 about their lives. Coming out as gay. Mental health challenges they face. Racism they face. Code-switching. Being a conservative in a liberal environment. Bullying. Friendship. They usually make me tear up. (Stupid onions.) After each one, I think to myself: “Wow, if I were a ninth grader hearing these seniors be raw and honest and vulnerable, it would help me on a path to become brave and speak my truth.” I also think: “Why don’t we collect these all and publish them somewhere?” I don’t want them lost.

One of my students this year told me I could put her senior speech on my blog. So here it is, for posterity.

How I Have Changed the Way I Have Thought about Myself and the World

 

When I was a lot younger, I was more hyperactive than I am now and I was always doing something to take up my time. I mainly always liked to keep myself out of my house because then I wouldn’t have to be in the middle of what was going on inside.

There was a lot of fighting that happened between my parents. They’d get physical with each other or throw things at each other. They never seemed to think of my brother and I being there.

I realize now that I was fearful of what was going on, that it put a lot of stress on me. When I was younger my thoughts were not so developed. When I would be with the rest of my family, my brother would be there to protect me. He could not prevent me from seeing or hearing certain things, but he would take my mind off of it the best he could. I don’t know what I figured the behavior between my parents meant or was- but if they were loving to me, I forgot about it and moved on. This was the way life went for me for many years. It was a contorted way of thinking.

At this time I also felt that the person I was defined by was my home life and my immediate family. I felt this way yet I didn’t think moments when my parents were violent towards each other or embarrassing my brother and I were moments that meant anything. I was always taught to let it pass and start new. That way of thinking ran me into trouble. I took what was happening in my home outside of it and I would have unkind thoughts/ engage in unkind behavior towards people I loved and cared for. Afterwards, whether I identified if it was mean or not, I would move on. I didn’t think it said anything about who I was.

Then in seventh grade I was in Ms. Oster’s health class and she showed us this speech by an author named George Saunders. It’s titled Advice to Graduates, and it is centered around the questions why aren’t we kinder? and how do we become more kind? It touched on the idea that becoming kinder comes with age but there are ways you can speed up the process. I didn’t feel like It wasn’t as if I hadn’t heard these words before, or as though this was a new concept to me but they processed differently this time and I began to question who I was.

I realized that I had always thought I was a really nice person but if I wasn’t genuinely acting kind, meaning my actions weren’t speaking for themselves, how could I be a nice person? This caused me to think back to things I had done and ask myself a series of questions like: Did I do the right thing? What did I feel that made me act the way I did? What caused that feeling to arise? Why could that feeling have been brought up?

Seeing that my actions didn’t reflect who I knew I was, I continued in life being very analytical of instinctual tendencies, thoughts, and behaviors. This way of questioning took over and continues to this day. Questioning myself allowed for me to realize the roots of my actions so I can allow myself to change. If I can identify the root, then maybe I can change the way I do things.

And so, through this process of questioning, I came across the concept of time and how I spend my time. I thought to myself what I spend my time doing makes me who I am. I thought, what had I been spending my time doing? School came to mind. I go to school most days out of the year and I am in school most hours out of each of those days. Again, it wasn’t that I didn’t know these facts before this moment but I had never paid attention to the concept. When I began to pay attention I realized that school was a place that nurtured me in all positive ways and I was taking it for granted. I could look to the building as a safe place, the teachers as people who could listen and give me advice and, my peers as those who stand equal to me in our journey to understand and live with ourselves. I am very grateful that I am able to attend school, have teachers who care for their students, students who engage deeply in class conversation, and a place that I can actually call my home.

At this point in my life I feel I have come a long way. Since 7th grade I have realized that a lot of what I was seeing when I was younger was my mom struggling with her mental health. In 8th grade child services took me from living at my mom’s house. They had been in and out of my life until this past summer when I permanently started living with my dad. It has been difficult accepting that my mom was not able to guide me through big developmental parts of my life but I love my mother and I am so thankful she is the woman I call my mom. Now here’s a George Saunders quote that is important to me.

“If we’re going to become kinder, that process has to include taking ourselves seriously — as doers, as accomplishers, as dreamers. We have to do that, to be our best selves.”

Now also, Over these years of high school I have come to understand that change is inevitable and a big part of our job is to adapt, learn, and accept it. Through that process I am continuously discovering my best self.

OAME 2019: The Teacher Voice

In August of 2018, I got a message from my friend Mary Bourassa who asked me if I was interested in being a featured speaker at OAME (the annual math teachers conference in Ottawa). I was absolutely going to say no, because I’m terrified of public speaking and I wasn’t sure I had anything of value to say to other teachers…

I know the irony of being scared of public speaking and being a teacher, but I know a lot of other teachers also feel this. But my biggest fear was just not being good enough. I wrote to Mary:

The truth is I can’t help feeling like this might be too big a leap for me. I don’t know if I could do what Fawn or Julie to me when I hear them talk, or do what Chris Shore or John Stevens do when they present. And I don’t want to commit unless I knew I wouldn’t be wasting anyone’s time. 

She replied:

Firstly, and most importantly, you would not be wasting anyone’s time.

I am a big proponent of elevating classroom teachers and giving them a voice and I hope that you will find yours for this event. 

As someone who feels like an evangelist of the online math teacher community, I’m always saying to people hesitant to dip their toes into the water that their voices and perspectives are important and valuable. And when I say this, I mean it with every fiber of my being. So why was I doubting the value of my own voice? I agreed to do the talk as long as I could do it with a collaborator and friend. It was a 75 minute talk (and an associated 75 minute workshop) and planning that individually seemed so not fun. But I thought working collaboratively would be so much more intellectually fun! So I dragged my friend Mattie Baker (@stoodle) into the presentation. We brainstormed for ages, but in the end, finally decided that the idea of “The Teacher Voice” was exactly what we needed to talk about.

It’s now over, so I’ll start with the ending. The lecture hall of 200 people for our talk was almost full. And the 75 minute talk went fabulously. I had to save some tweets for posterity.

tweet0

tweet1

tweet2

tweet3

tweet4

tweet5

tweet6

tweet7

And OMG, we got a standing ovation. That was unexpected. And people were crying. That too was unexpected. I am not someone who feels proud about things easily. I usually focus on all that went wrong or ways I could have been better. But when we took a bow at the end and people stood up, my heart was bursting. All the work Mattie and I put into the talk for the previous 10 months, the weekends we sacrificed to write and practice and edit felt purposeful because at least for some teachers in the audience, our message was at least temporarily valuable. Weirdly my fear of public speaking disappeared the day of the talk after we had a solid rehearsal the previous day, and my fear of wasting peoples’ time disappeared after the talk ended and people came up to say such nice things to us.

The talk was broken into two parts. First, Mattie and I shared something we each did in our classrooms that was inspired by other teachers, and then adopted by other teachers. We wanted the audience to have something concrete to walk away with in case the rest of our talk didn’t resonate with them. We were breaking down the silos of our classrooms. Second, we each talked about the emotional life of a teacher. We wanted to break down the silos of our emotional worlds. There were so many messages we included in this part of the talk. Mattie shared his first year in teaching, which he previously shared on the Story Collider podcast. But here is one takeaway from my section of the talk:

Teaching is hard. We are going to feel bad. We’re going to be bad. And that’s okay. It’s okay to not love what you’re doing all the time. I’ve never met a teacher who is putting themselves out there in the important but hard ways who does. But we can be brought closer as we become vulnerable and share these things and realize we aren’t all alone in this.

And a second related takeaway:

Often times, we’re so critical about ourselves, we think of all that isn’t going right, all that we aren’t doing… that we lose sight of all that we are…. It’s so easy to be critical of yourself, to set the bar high, to see all the ways you’re not succeeding.

You see yourself in one way. But the reality of the situation is: We aren’t really all that good at seeing ourselves. That’s my big realization, and it only took twelve years. When we’re down and think we suck, yeah, we probably definitely maybe can be doing better. But hell if we aren’t already doing good, and we need to acknowledge that and spread it. We need to believe our friends when they tell us that our ideas our good, that something we did was good… we need to believe our kids when they say something spontaneous and positive about something happening in the classroom… and… we need to be sharing the good and the positive that we see in others. We need to help others see how important they are to you. We need to give cupcakes, send the random email, prop each other up, and help others see how they make your life better.

The talk focused on the hard times in teaching, and what we do when we hit them. At one point I asked the audience to share their coping strategies at the low points. I promised I would share them online, so here are what the audience typed. It’s amazing how similar the responses are…

(All the references to “coffee” in quotations comes from part of Mattie’s talk. You can interpret that to be getting a drink at happy hour.)

I shared my coping strategies afterward, and so many of them were covered by what people in the audience typed! Except for those people who talked about exercise and running and the gym and other evil things like that. Some of my favorites!

love

love2

love3

In the talk, I also shared the Explore Math project that I do with students. The website that I created for the project is here: https://explore-math.weebly.com/

I posted about it early on when I first started it, but haven’t done any additional posts on how I’ve changed it or how it’s evolved or what I’ve noticed when doing it with different grades (sorry, I should). The posts are here, here, and here. The most important thing I can suggest is that you need to adapt it to work for your kids and your school. For example, this year I tried this in 10th grade and it wasn’t as successful overall because I think the kids needed more structure and hand-holding. So I’m going to take that into account for next year.

Two teachers shared their experiences with the project, which I couldn’t fit into the talk. So I’m posting them here in case it entices you to do the project or some variation in your classroom.

 

 

At the conference, Mattie and I also gave a 75 minute workshop on the online math teacher community designed for people who were interested in joining in but didn’t know how (our slides for that are here).